Parenting Resources

Becoming the Parent You Want To Be: A Sourcebook of Strategies for the First Five Years. (1997)
Dragon Mom: Confessions of a Child Development Expert (1995)
Hope and Healing: Peaceful Parenting in an Uncertain World (2002)
How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk (1999)
Kids Are Worth It! Giving Your Child the Gift of Inner Discipline (2002)
Parent Effectiveness Training: The Proven Program for Raising Responsible Children (2000)
Parenting for a Peaceful World (2005)
Parenting from the Inside Out: How a Deeper Self-Understanding Can Help You Raise Children Who Thrive (2004)
Parenting from the Inside Out: How a Deeper Self-Understanding Can Help You Raise Children Who Thrive (2004)
Parenting with Love and Logic: Teaching Children Responsibility (1990)
Peaceful Parents, Peaceful Kids: Practical Ways to Create a Calm and Happy Home (2000)
Positive Parenting for a Peaceful World: A Practical Guide for the First Twelve Years (2006)
Raising Children Compassionately: Parenting the Nonviolent Communication Way (Nonviolent Communication Guides (2004)
Raising Peaceful Children In A Violent World (1997)
Raising Self-Reliant Children in a Self-Indulgent World: Seven Building Blocks for Developing Capable Young Children (2000)
Simple Secrets of Parenting: Easy as ABC (1997)
Unconditional Parenting: Moving from Rewards and Punishments to Love and Reason (2006)

Becoming the Parent You Want To Be: A Sourcebook of Strategies for the First Five Years. (1997)

Author: Laura Davis and Janice Keyser
The authors present a warm, upbeat approach to child
rearing. Their philosophy includes parenting principles such as cultivating a spirit of optimism, developing a vision for your family, teaching children to feel safe, strong and good about their world, learning to value struggle and disequilibrium and building a supportive community.
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Dragon Mom: Confessions of a Child Development Expert (1995)

Author: Janet Gonzalez-Mena
The author writes with wit and frank honesty about the discrepancy between her expert self and the “Dragon Mom” that is only known to those in her own home.
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Hope and Healing: Peaceful Parenting in an Uncertain World (2002)

Author: Naomi Drew

Naomi Drew writes as a mother, a teacher, and an expert on conflict resolution. She has written a book that helps parents keep peace at home, step by easy step, while also raising compassionate kids to help make peace possible in the world at large.
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How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk (1999)

Authors: Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish
This book is an excellent communication tool kit that provides a step-by-step approach to improving relationships in your home. The ideas are simple and effective and build self-esteem.
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Kids Are Worth It! Giving Your Child the Gift of Inner Discipline (2002)

Author: Barbara Coloroso
The author provides insights on how parents can be both firm and flexible, referring to this style as “Backbone” parents as opposed to “Jellyfish or Brickwall” parents. A reader writes, “I recommend this book to anyone who wants to quit being their child’s conscience and instead give them the gift of developing and using their own.
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Parent Effectiveness Training: The Proven Program for Raising Responsible Children (2000)

Author: Thomas Gordon
This is a classic book based on P.E.T. trainings that began almost forty years ago as the first national parent-training program to teach how to communicate more effectively with kids and offer step-by-step advice to resolving family conflicts so everybody wins.
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Parenting for a Peaceful World (2005)

Author: Robin Grille
Parenting for a Peaceful World is a fascinating look at how child-rearing customs have shaped societies and major world events. It reveals how children adapt to and are influenced by different parenting styles and how safeguarding their emotional development is the key to creating a more peaceful, harmonious, and sustainable world.
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Parenting from the Inside Out: How a Deeper Self-Understanding Can Help You Raise Children Who Thrive (2004)

Authors: Daniel Siegel & Mary Hartzell
The authors explore the extent to which our childhood experiences shape the way we parent. The authors offer parents a step-by-step approach to forming a deeper understanding of their own life stories, which ultimately helps them learn how to raise compassionate and resilient children.
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Parenting from the Inside Out: How a Deeper Self-Understanding Can Help You Raise Children Who Thrive (2004)

Authors: Daniel Siegel & Mary Hartzell
The authors explore the extent to which our childhood experiences shape the way we parent. The authors offer parents a step-by-step approach to forming a deeper understanding of their own life stories, which ultimately helps them learn how to raise compassionate and resilient children.
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Parenting with Love and Logic: Teaching Children Responsibility (1990)

Authors: Foster W. Cline & Jim Fay
The authors’ approach to child rearing allows children to make choices and learn from the consequences. “Love and Logic” parents teach their children responsibility and the logic of life by encouraging them to solve their own problems.
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Peaceful Parents, Peaceful Kids: Practical Ways to Create a Calm and Happy Home (2000)

Author: Naomi Drew
This guide provides a step-by-step plan to encourage active listening and conflict resolution and explains techniques that will help children cope with stress and talk about their problems instead of resorting to angry outbursts and fights. Topics are illustrated by concrete situations, hands-on examples, and testimonials.
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Positive Parenting for a Peaceful World: A Practical Guide for the First Twelve Years (2006)

Authors: Ruth Todd & Janet Bloomfield
Two experts in non-violence show how to practice established conflict resolution techniques with children from birth through adolescence. A better awareness of our own needs and wants and peaceful ways to meet them leads to families sharing, working and playing together so that peace is a normal feature of their daily life.
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Raising Children Compassionately: Parenting the Nonviolent Communication Way (Nonviolent Communication Guides (2004)

Author: Marshall B. Rosenberg
This booklet, using the Nonviolent Communication (NVC) process, stresses the importance of putting compassionate connection first to create a mutually respectful, enriching family dynamic. Rosenberg’s process helps children learn to successfully resolve conflicts and express themselves clearly.
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Raising Peaceful Children In A Violent World (1997)

Authors: Nancy Lee Cecil & Patricia L. Roberts
The authors offer practical advice, particularly about conflict resolution and appreciation for diversity. A reader writes, “This is the best practical guide to teaching children the value of peace and nonviolence.”
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Raising Self-Reliant Children in a Self-Indulgent World: Seven Building Blocks for Developing Capable Young Children (2000)

Authors: H. Stephen Glenn & Jane Ed.D. Nelsen
Reviewer Kenn Kassman writes: “The book stresses the development of personal capabilities and perceptions. Chapters cover the fostering of intra- and interpersonal skills, systemic skills (such as responsibility, adaptability and cause and effect) and judgmental skills. Although the skills mentioned are to be instilled in the child, one really cannot do this without rethinking and re-enforcing them in oneself.”
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Simple Secrets of Parenting: Easy as ABC (1997)

Author: John Q. Baucom
This work is from the Child Welfare League of America to promote positive parenting. The book is a lighthearted, warm and insightful guide to raising children.
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Unconditional Parenting: Moving from Rewards and Punishments to Love and Reason (2006)

Author: Alfie Kohn
Kohn posits that typical parenting techniques such as time-out, threats and rewards only result in short-term compliance. The author offers alternative techniques such as helping children solve problems, providing them with choices, and using reason, humor and, as a last resort; a restorative time away (not a punitive time-out) to help children become caring, competent and responsible.